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CSPAN
Nov 18, 2012 9:00pm EST
for a number of years mostly brown university, so i really didn't teach the 60's because it wasn't history but later on that became an important part of my courses and then i've written some books which talked about aspects of the 60's and like a lot of other historians i became uncomfortable in the notion that the sixties could be described as something 1960 to 1976 so they like to talk to the 30's or the 20s or the 90's and so forth you can do that because of the power throughout the decade. mostly it doesn't work and here is the 60's i don't think it does either. because if you look back at what was happening in the early 60's, 60, 61, 63, 64, at least until kennedy assassination in november, 1963 and so much of daily life and popular culture and music and politics and so forth and the way people dress and so forth seem very much like the 50's and when we think of the fifties we think of a lot of turmoil, political polarization, urban riots, vietnam, rock concert and woodstock and so on and i became convinced that you really shouldn't talk about the 60's, 1960 to 1970 but someth
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2012 1:40pm EST
brown, a few other officers, but scott is the most important. they become very much -- their agenda very much is to build a proper professional institution and take expertise, usually european, usually french, and bring it to the united states. so, another major figure of this would be astaire, who was sent on a mission to france, basically to collect information about military education. he collects huge numbers of books and material. comes back to west point, and with the support of people like scott -- scott becomes a permanent general during the war of 1812 -- he is able to systemize the west point curriculum and experience that been the had not been the case before. >> host: when was west point founded? >> guest: 1802. i think historians still argue about what thomas jefferson was really after when the school was founded. but no one disagrees the school is institutionally weak, unclear what the purpose of the institution is. there's not very systemized instruction. cadets are older, some younger, and to this day he is called the father of west point because he puts it on sounde
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2012 10:30am EDT
, immediately he is cast as a future presidential hope old. for example, scott brown hadn't even been sworn in in massachusetts and the url scott brown.com -- scott brown 2012 was very purchased. with so many women have been in washington are so many years as legislatures and working on porting work and yet their names never bubbled to the top were curious, why not? >> how did you decide you wanted to write this book? i mean, all three of you studied similar topics, but how did the book actually come about by >> your idea, ted. >> well, i guess it was my idea. i'd been a political nerd since i was, i don't know, my parents still remember my sister and i in 1960s staging the nixon kennedy debate with our staff animals. and during all of this years of nerd am, what i was fascinated anywhere the magazine issues that would come out way in advance of the presidential election, that would previewed the eight or 10 or 12 people who ought to be considered and that simply struck me after seeing so many of those issues in so many magazines that women were not making it. they were not been thought to
CSPAN
Nov 4, 2012 1:00am EDT
brown versus board of education and incredible struggle. tucson will be vindicated. program will be in because it's a mandate that tum pets state law. if you have a first amendment right to have your own text and crime line up and what is more important is it is egregious that we would deny the true history of arizona. i met this young student, and he said, jeff, you need to collect our stories. i want to be part of the history books too, one day, and not be left out. i need to know that we are part of the greater american experience and we have to stop the denial of contributions of the people who have been rooted here to all the 21 tribes, to the mexican-americans who have been here for centuries. we have to stop this dishonest wreckenning of the facts where we just throw numbers around, and the border and security and immigration, when, in true, we know that this is not true, but more importantly, we have to stop the sanctions of racial profiling. be it in our schools, in our streets, and now with sb1070. just think, last week, the nation could not believe it, that provision 2b of 1
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2012 6:00pm EDT
. >> first one he's in his office in april of 1987 and he was having a meeting with brown, former defense secretary for jimmy carter and just going over parts of his program. i think brown was an informal advisor to his campaign, we're in his house office and i was just siting in -- sitting in a chair while this discussion was going on. i was listening to howard brown. >> the other one. >> this is what i call the dead tired at 5:00 p.m. shot. it's live at 5 in boston and it's that whole look of being wired up to the electronic media, getting a free spot on the news, and spelling it is what you want to tell but looking -- just waiting to go on for the green light to go on, the cameras, and he has that zombie expression on his face. >> >> and these two. >> this was in a factory in new hampshire. where he was listening to a factory worker and seemed to be impatient with it and the last photograph was taken after the faneuil hall debate. we had driven that evening from boston up to manchester in a blizzard and everybody decided, the reporters and can't date, to -- candidate to go down to the
CSPAN
Nov 6, 2012 10:00pm EST
. >> okay, we're going to go now to massachusetts where scott brown, senator scott brown is speaking to supporters. >> [inaudible] [cheers and applause] >> [inaudible] [cheers and applause] >> i want to thank my mom, i want to thank my mom -- [cheers and applause] [inaudible] >> i'm not sure what's going to happen, but -- [inaudible] [cheers and applause] [laughter] [cheers and applause] >> concession speech, one of the most competitive seats in the country, millions of dollars on both sides. i think scott brown ran a good race. sometimes you raise the money, you run a good race, you draw a good opponent, and you happen to represent a state that's not very hospitable to your party, and you lose. >> that's right. scott brown is going to be the senator with the highest approval rating ever to be defeated in modern memory. his approval rating is in the 60s, and yet he's losing. and that's because he won in a special election where massachusetts, which in 2004 was the most democratic state in the nation, john kerry got more votes there, a higher percentage of the votes there than he did any
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2012 7:15am EST
. went offered various sizes of filet mignon she asked for queen sized fillet cuts with hash browns, potatoes and onions, because i never tasted them before. on her departure she wrote a letter to ronald reagan describing the time she had done what she liked best in america, looking at beautiful thoroughbreds, and walking in the wide-open spaces by the mountains. the american west had long held a fascination for the queen, and one of her most intriguing american friends has been monty roberts, a california cowboy known as a horse whisperer for his humane techniques to train horses in a circular can. she was so impressed by what she had read about his approach that she invited him to demonstrate his techniques at windsor castle in 1989. come show me this client's cage of yours, she said. do i need a whip and a chain? as monty recalled to me she said it not only with a twinkle but that her method of addressing him, clearly her talent put him at ease. demonstration was a big success and the queen and the cowboys struck up a fast friendship. over lunch in the castle gardens she asked hi
CSPAN
Nov 5, 2012 5:00pm EST
. scott brown, special election, and the presidential turnout, the burden was even heavier on him. he needed to win well over the majority of independents and also about a quarter were 20% of democrats to help with the turnout. i think he's going to fall just short. i think he deserves credit for making this a close race for a republican senator there, his favorability ratings remain high. and i think elizabeth warren should be considered a favorite going into election day. >> another race is the commonwealth of virginia. trying to recapture his old seat. >> they are very well known throughout the state. both are talking about their time as governor. the governor is very well-known and well-liked. i think both parties going into this felt like this is going to be a flip for whoever wins the presidency. when the cells take this lightly i think some people started reaping. i think that alan is running slightly ahead we still think it is very neck and neck. i think it's going to be a very close margin and i think that we will use is very heavy turnout. and i think that even alan coul
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2012 9:30am EST
manifesto which is the protest of the supreme court decision in the brown versus board of education system of 1954. strom thurmond is the record holder on this one man filibuster 18 minutes he spoke against the 1957 civil rights bill. remember him as one of the dead by dogs and he was, he was one of the last demagogue's but what we forget a lot one of the first of the sun will conservative. and now the sun belt one of the big stories, one of the major stories in the history of 20th century american politics and that is the flow of jobs come industries, resources as the states from the northeast and midwest and the south and the southwest in the post world war ii period. southern states were recording industry is passing the right to
CSPAN
Nov 11, 2012 6:00pm EST
worldwide. his name is michael peach, and he's the publisher of little brown who is tom wolfe's publisher. if he'll stand, i would hope he could be recognized. mike? there he is. thank you, michael. [applause] >> welcome. >> thank you. and our sponsor, one of the really great sponsors that we've had for many, many years, they've been really huge supporters of the miami book fair, and that's wpbt, channel 2. and to get our program off the ground, i want to bring out the executive vice president and chief operating officer, delaware hour race sukdeo please, please, welcome her. thank you all. >> have a good evening. [applause] >> thank you, everyone, and welcome. my name is delores, i'm the coo for wpbt-2 which is your public television station. [applause] now, what i love about the miami book fair is that for me it represents how we should be known here in miami. sure, we have beautiful beaches, we've got some interesting politics. i think increasingly we'll be known for our wacky characters. but if you look to the person to your right and if you speak to the person to your left, what you
CSPAN
Nov 7, 2012 5:00pm EST
the memos in the brown v. board of education case. >> guest: right. >> host: tell us what his role of and why it turned out to be controversial. >> guest: well, he actually wrote a number of memos, and they kind of, those memos stumbled out on stage in a very rough sequence over many years later, and they came back to haunt him. what he did -- so he gets there, and percolating up through the courts already, going back to -- back to 1950, are the cases of the naacp, legal and education defense fund, that thurgood marshall is actually bringing, and he's building it sort of brick-by-brick, block-by-block, and thurgood marshall not yet a justice of the supreme court making the case that plessi versus ferguson, defined the case of separate, but equal, defining the case in the naacp, that this can want remain the law of the -- cannot remain the law of the land. it's clear that the case that's going to be a very, very important one for the court, and it's the year that rehnquist is there, is brown versus board of education. it turns out, in fact, to be the case that strikes that doctrine
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2012 12:00pm EST
, brown and root has sued the federal government to pay the $85 million in damages k.b.r. owes soldiers sickened because of k.b.r.'s negligence. this case started in 2003 when members of the oregon national guard were assigned to provide security for contractors from k.b.r. in iraq at the karmant ali water treatment facility. these soldiers and others were exposed to dangerous levels of chemicals, including sodium dichromate -- that hexovalient chromium, one of the most carcinogenic chemicals on earth. a group of the exposed soldiers sued k.b.r. based on the evidence indicating k.b.r. managers were aware of the presence of the dangerous chemicals but failed to warn the soldiers working in and around the plant. a jury recently agreed that k.b.r. was negligent and awarded the soldiers $85 million in damages. and more of the affected soldiers also have lawsuits pending so the damage awards, in my view, are likely to increase significantly. however, a recently declassified indemnification provision in the contract between k.b.r. and the u.s. military for work in iraq passed all fin
CSPAN
Nov 11, 2012 8:00pm EST
the rest of her mother's papers into helping brown's papers and i corresponded with her by e-mail and masse to do an interview and said he said everything in the book and unless i have a specific question that she really didn't want to see and to be a cynic could not contact. >> could you expand a little more on the first lady's domestic agenda -- [inaudible] >> and she became first lady a difficult time. she had an agenda. her first as volunteerism, although she's very interested in reading. a volunteerism is something very dear to her because she did very much believe in people helping other people. you have to remember 1969 the country was in tremendous turmoil says something like volunteerism is not going to be a cause that would catch on with the general public. she also did run into obstacles of a very tense situation between the west wing in a string. she did run into issues in terms of being able to explore and find herself. she did have other things domestically although jackie kennedy gets a tremendous amount or redecorating the white house and actually pat did more of that.
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2012 6:45am EST
don't have to move manufacturing to the lowest cost of labor or brown sites in the middle of industrial waste land. you can move manufacturing to where people live and where they have ideas and needs. is a shorter supply chain, more sustainable manufacturing, just-in-time manufacturing, contact between the way things are made and consumed, a fundamentally healthy model. >> we have time for one last question. i know whenever you open questions up, the power of the internet and distributed anything, you get one really wacky question. i thought we would end on that. i would love to see this scenario. software tools honors used by people design cool stuff and 3d printers on the moon which produce that using local materials. how realistic is this and what's the food you see produce up there? >> that is the star trek replicated. that is where what you have in that model, there is a box. the box has so many feedstocks. whether their atoms or molecules, imagine piles of goo that you would say you want something, it would just download the recipe, it would mix them in the right propor
CSPAN
Nov 10, 2012 3:45pm EST
is elected to senatorship, immediately this, a future presidential hopeful. scott brown had not since warning yet in massachusetts. and so many have been in washington for 7 years. and we were curious why not. >> how did you decide to write this book. how did this book come about. i had been a political nerd since i was -- staging a
CSPAN
Nov 10, 2012 6:00pm EST
founding era. teaches at brown. c-span: his politics? >> guest: i really can't say what his politics are. i don't know that much about it. c-span: his slant? do you know which--i mean, i'm looking at page 46: 'both wood and his critics take it as a given that blacks and women were excluded from the declaration. such is the state of the debate within the historian's guild.' and you quote him earlier, 'gordon wood, widely regarded as the leading historian of political thought of the american founding, asked, "what was radical about the declaration in 1776? we know it did not mean that blacks and men were created equal to men--white men," although, it would in time be used to justify these equalities, too'--you have that in parentheses--'it was radical in 1776 because it meant that all white men were equal. surprisingly, wood was actually trying to defend the founders with this statement.' >> guest: right. i mean, he--the historian's profession, as i understand it, is--right now is being --is divided by a--one group on the far left, who wants to say that the american founding was just t
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2012 6:00pm EST
to the rest of her mother's papers into helene browne's papers. i corresponded with her by e-mail and asked if she would be willing to do an interview. she said she'd said everything she wanted to say in her book unless you have a specific question that she really didn't want to be interviewed and i could not contact her sister. >> hi, mary. could you expand on the first lady's domestic agenda and why you think it didn't spark? >> she became first lady of difficult time. she had agenda. her first cause was volunteerism. although she was also very interested in reading and volunteerism is something very dear to it because she didn't very much believe in people helping other people. but you have to remember in 1969 the countries and tremendous turmoil and says something like volunteerism was not going to be a cause that would catch on with the general public. she also ran into obstacles, a very tense situation between the west wing any swing and she did run into issues in terms of being able to explore and find herself. she did have a good thing she domestically although jackie kenn
CSPAN
Nov 15, 2012 11:00pm EST
are also simply losing support. this is much more exciting, with brian brown, who runs the organization -- the national organization for marriage. and he talks about how they were outspent this time. they have seen their support true. they are not going to go away. i agree with patrick, i think they could come back in a forceful way. but they have seen their support shrink and their grassroots support shrink and they have seen their donor base train. the mormon church as a player he did not see in this campaign. they were the dominant player and you also saw a a lot of the individual donors on that side, where is on the pro-quality side, you saw fair-minded people across the board standing up and campaigning for these initiatives on our side, and also digging deep in writing big checks. [inaudible name] was the single largest personal contribution, contributed 2.5 million in the state of washington. so you look across the board and arm in arm with our allies. >> the blue state argument, it's true. it happened in the blue state. >> okay, the state of maine has two republican
CSPAN
Nov 29, 2012 8:00pm EST
me get the entire list because i'm proud that they've joined me in this effort -- brown of ohio, cardin, and now senator inhofe have joined me in filing an amendment to this defense authorization bill that would impose an asset freeze and visa ban on any outside parties that are providing support to the m-23 rebels. an amendment i urge my friends, senators levin and mccain, to accept. i hope such sanctions won't be needed and that wiser heads prevail. the people of eastern congo have suffered long enough. now, i know that senator levin is working for the approval of this amendment. i sincerely hope that it can be done before the end of the evening. i'm going to at this point yield the floor in the hopes that we can bring this to a positive conclusion. mr. inhofe: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from oklahoma. mr. inhofe: let me compliment the senator on his concern for this activity that's going on there. i would like to clarify, though, for the record because i have had personal conversations wit with -- with the president, with many members of the staff and g
CSPAN
Nov 13, 2012 12:00pm EST
building standards under then-governor brown who was known partially for this in the doons bury as governor moon beam. but he got it passed, so every new building in california had to meet energy efficiency standards. it's made california very efficient. these are the kinds of things, and as i said, portman and shaheen have been working on a compromise on this. these are the kinds of things we can do to make ourselves energy independent. my view, look, katrina -- sorry, sandy gave some impetus to dealing with climate change. and i said in new york we're going to pay for climate change one way or the ore. we can pay for it after each natural disaster. we in new york have had 50 -- sorry, we have had three or four hundred-year disasters -- sorry, i'm phrasing it wrong. we have had in the last three or four year, we have had once in 100-year disasters. with irene, with sandy. and so, you know, i think it will give some impetus to deal with climate change, but even if we can't reach compromise on that, there's lots of things in energy that we can reach compromise on, and that would be
CSPAN
Nov 8, 2012 9:00am EST
environment makes it difficult for them to vote for scott brown and linda lingle and heather wilson. the problems with republicans is that they're based -- that's a very ideologically driven voters, tea party folks, but part of the republican base is more open, friendly, to voting for democrats than the democratic base is for voting for republicans, i believe. i'm sure we could chew this over. let me give you an example. but me give you an example. heidi is a terrific candidate in north olympic terrific candidate and north dakota. mitt romney won north dakota by 20, 21 points. and heidi was able to overcome that. it's true that she won them as the president one north dakota, slightly less than president, that mr. romney one north dakota slightly less than the president one massachusetts. but i think the republican coalition includes kind of a soft swing voter that is inclined to vote republican, but is more willing to vote for democrats. and, jim matheson surviving utah is amazing. amazing. john barrow in georgia, yes, a republican candidate against john darrell was horrendous. when was
CSPAN
Nov 15, 2012 8:00pm EST
and if you look at legacies, one can go the route of plessy v. ferguson or brown v. board and i get to say these things is as a nonlawyer although having spent to the last few years of my life with smart lawyers, that i try to learn from and nana certainly the expert on this panel for the justices are likely to go but i'm incredibly optimistic in the case and i assume the doma cases wouldn't be filed either by the brilliant lawyers and the legal organizations so i'm optimistic. i think it's a mistake to write off anything. >> let's could move to capitol hill and just thinking, we talked earlier about tammy baldwin. patrick, what do you think her presence in the senate will mean in the -- and there were other lawmakers, lgbt lawmakers elected the cycle. is that going to change the dynamic on the hill at all? >> sure and it's a lot to put on her shoulders to change the constitution of the u.s. senate. if anyone is capable of that, tammy is in the things we have learned in the state legislatures around the country is even in some of the toughest states with the toughest debates, when ther
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2012 2:45pm EST
suffering. >> h. rapp brown. >> burn, baby, burn. >> they didn't think to say -- it's a little narrower than that. we've now been almost five years into this crisis, and different economic ideas have -- people have made predicts. people have said not so much the numbers on gdp but how things would... >> there's one aspect of pics at the blog a little bit earlier it is more flexible wages, no unions. the economy is going to perform better. and the countries in which the stronger union and better job protection done better in responding to the crisis. the best country in terms of labor market. what's interesting from the point of view of economics, economic theory is this crisis has been wonderful. doing that to test it processes. it's shutting a lot of light on a lot of different issues at a good cause to a lot of people in a lot of these countries. >> this is the question addressed to both of you. what is your view on the standardization dear subject to it, expected utility in economics? does it describe reality? especially considering experiences in international economics and
CSPAN
Nov 5, 2012 12:00am EST
trips, and i know people think that and hear that and they think brown bags and yellow buses. but there is nothing that replaces the sensation of being in a historic place, seeing it, feeling it, touching it. sometimes even smelling it. and that's what provides us the real sense that this is something that happened to real people. forgive me. i keep losing my -- >> host: we'll let you get that adjusted. and i want to read this quote from your don't know much about mythology book. you write: one of the saddest things i have witnessed in these years-especially when it visit schools, is how the innate and insatiable curiosity young children have about the world gets absolutely killed by the teedum of school. i also remember so well how myths saved one little boy from that teedum. >> guest: true story. i remember being a child sitting in school, watching -- we had that clock on the wall, and i would watch it tick toward 4:00, and one of the times i felt some sense of real excitement was when our teacher would stop at the end of the day and she would read from the odyssey, a text versi
CSPAN
Nov 17, 2012 8:00pm EST
book and read the opening sentence in the store. jackie browne at 26 with no expression on his face said that he could get some guns. i finished the book at home and one sitting and it was like 180 pages and felt like i -- he moved the story almost entirely with dialogue. the conversation of cops and criminals. their voices establishing the style. i stopped trying to tell those what was going in the book and began to show. began to show in pot i want of view in the views of the characters. bad guys and good ones. often cannot resist a set piece with a crazy kind of scat logical poetry, the matter of george v. hying ins. that's pretty much how i learned to write in a style i lifted from hyingens but changed enough until it became my own sound. i want to thank the national book foundation for my award, and recognize executive directer, and his people for keeping this event on track despite sandy trying to stop us. they deserve our thanks and praise. i have to tell you -- [applause] i have to tell you i'm energized by the honor. the only thing i wanted to do in my life is have a good t
CSPAN
Nov 22, 2012 6:00am EST
endlessly for her assertiveness basically. the same thing that elizabeth warren faced in scott brown, which was to sneer at her as an elite professor, which really got to me. it means we started teaching about the same time. for women of color and the entire united states teaching the, two blacks, one nation, one latina. and that is not so long ago. a few years afterwards i went into the classroom and having mostly men in a classroom, most of whom on election night before the election was decided i had to turn us in a classroom and was filled with that romney's. i woke up to a brand-new world. this is the way law schools looked when i was coming out. when you first started teaching to the woman, when he lived in massachusetts he didn't just say professor, he said blake though you could really profess anything. i really rocketed me back. so i think in addition to the mockery generally and the electorate, in addition to the demeaning of women generally, you sort of have a celebrated when were hired, but it's also a double whammy in a political setting. >> i'm in washington. it's an int
CSPAN
Nov 7, 2012 12:00pm EST
murphy brown because look how cool it is that women are wearing pantsuits. now women are the majority of the work force. they became the majority, and now it's kind of even, right? but still that's pretty remarkable. you have over the course of, what, 40 years, you know, men's wages kind of steadily stagnating and then declining whereas women's wages are steadily increasing. now, men on average still make more, but you know, if you look at the charts, the trends are very much like this. and then couple that with the types of jobs that are opening up. so, basically, the way it works is women with college degrees enter the work force at greater numbers, and then they open up the kinds of jobs that women used to do for free. >> host: right. >> guest: so that's like childcare and food preparation, you know, service economy, elder care. and you have this booming health care industry, so you see it's like this cascading effect where there opens up more jobs for women, and, you know, and also the end of the manufacturing era. that's the most literal interpretation. >> host: right. >
CSPAN
Nov 29, 2012 11:00pm EST
. if you want to know about the mail, turn to page 572. there's gordon brown and his sense ailments, 564. and what it peers morgan knew about fun hacking, page 615. >> register with this fast work, we cannot draw back and look at some of the big themes here. one of the central wants us the question of her dress. how to change the balance of power to give more rights to those unfortunate innocent individuals for whatever reason find themselves in the process of the press frenzy, their lives trash and chased and bullied the most very wealthy indeed, nothing they can do about it. >> a persuasive and 30 club months were justice leveson bed at his statement it report. he would take no questions that statement if ever for the speaker themselves. his inquiry was triggered by victims of the press and weber at the reports
CSPAN
Nov 6, 2012 6:00am EST
jerry brown, managed to do that, too. those are all steps in the right direction. we are only going to get there through cutting spending in the united states. the idea that you're going to have tax increases, close the deficit that way, the thing that president is trying in france right now, president or prime minister, whatever he is, but 75% tax rate. history has shown again and again going back to the first deficits that hoover ran during the great depression when, as history has forgotten, began the process that franklin roosevelt continued of deficit spending in order to take up the slack in aggregate demand. you never reduce your debt that way. tax increases do not reduce debt. the new money that comes and gets spent on new programs that get created. those programs perpetuate themselves and they require new spending and new borrowing. cutting spending is the only way to get there. this was the shining inside of the tea party. and i'm sorry, i'm a little bit, i should apologize a little bit for my fellow cosmo carrion's who, you know, i think did not give proper credit to the tea
CSPAN
Nov 20, 2012 8:00pm EST
administration lost control of it, wrestle it back after scott brown and after they lost their majority in january the following year, but then, of course, occupy wall street adds welcoming up -- as well coming up. obama keeps them at arms' length for the most part. i think the thinking, and i hear this from progressive activists over the last few days is a bit of a -- what's that line, lbj, you know, says to various leaders of his day, make me do it. you know, -- marlin -- martin luther king and others, make me do it. people are getting a system that obama and the signaling system of america, there is a need, even after obama's done, after a new election, there's a sense of a new start is make him arise in new ways to the challenge of the moment. that's an interestst -- interesting moment, looking back in 2009, thinking clearly with a hard eye about maybe what he might have done and now having a fresh hundred days to capitalize on. >> do you agree with john that he's essentially a pragmatist? >> i do. i do think he's a pragmatist. it's interesting. i think that he's a guy who, in my re
CSPAN
Nov 10, 2012 9:00am EST
, road trips. i know people think that, hear that and think brown bags and yellow buses, but there is nothing that replaces the sensation of being in an historic place come as the net come the feeling feeling, touching it, sometimes even smelling it. that is what provides us the real sons is something that happened to real people. forgive me, i keep losing my sib here. >> host: we will let you get that adjusted and i want to read this quote from your don't know much about mythology book. you write, one of the saddest things i witnessed in the series, especially when i visit schools is that the innate and insatiable curiosity of children have about the world gets absolutely killed by the tedium of score. i also remember so well how myths save one little boy. >> guest: true story. again, i like to tell true stories. i remember being a child sitting in schools, watching the clock upon the wall. i would watch the clock ticked towards 3:00 when we get released and i remember the only time i thought -- not the only time come to certainly one of the time i felt some sense of real exciteme
CSPAN
Nov 21, 2012 11:00pm EST
save itself from itself and jim brown, the nfl legendary, the legendary nfl running back was on the panel and dan garza, professor at stanford who has worked on mouthguard technology that can measure the force of impacts on the head and kevin turner who was the subject of documentary which you will see a clip of it called american man produced by a colleague of mine who works at hbo. so, this panel will be featured in a show on the world channel on november 20 at 8:00 p.m. and on line as well. pbs is working with, public television is working with the aspen institute to turn this into a one-hour session. there will be a whole one-hour session which will include conversations about football safety but we are going to play about a ten-minute clip of that. [no audio] [inaudible conversations] let's come back to it. sorry about that. so what i would like to do now is start off this conversation about the under 14 question, the pre-high school equation and i would like to do that with our special guest, dr. robert cantu who many of you will of course are familiar with. he is the chief of
CSPAN
Nov 21, 2012 8:00pm EST
we convened a panel called head games, can foot all save itself from itself and jim brown, the nfl legendary, the legendary nfl running back was on the panel and dan garza, professor at stanford who has worked on mouthguard technology that can measure the force of impacts on the head and kevin turner who was the subject of documentary which you will see a clip of it called american man produced by a colleague of mine who works at hbo. so, this panel will be featured in a show on the world channel on november 20 at 8:00 p.m. and on line as well. pbs is working with, public television is working with the aspen institute to turn this into a one-hour session. there will be a whole one-hour session which will include conversations about football safety but we are going to play about a ten-minute clip of that. [no audio] [inaudible conversations] let's come back to it. sorry about that. so what i would like to do now is start off this conversation about the under 14 question, the pre-high school equation and i would like to do that with our special guest, dr. robert cantu who many of you
CSPAN
Nov 12, 2012 11:00pm EST
same thing that elizabeth warren faced in scott brown, which was to sneer at her as an elite professor, which really got to me. it means we started teaching about the same time. for women of color and the entire united states teaching the, two blacks, one nation, one latina. and that is not so long ago. a few years afterwards i went into the classroom and having mostly men in a classroom, most of whom on election night before the election was decided i had to turn us in a classroom and was filled with that romney's. i woke up to a brand-new world. this is the way law schools looked when i was coming out. when you first started teaching to the woman, when he lived in massachusetts he didn't just say professor, he said blake though you could really profess anything. i really rocketed me back. so i think in addition to the mockery generally and the electorate, in addition to the demeaning of women generally, you sort of have a celebrated when were hired, but it's also a double whammy in a political setting. >> i'm in washington. it's an interesting place. i love d.c., but when you look at
CSPAN
Nov 22, 2012 3:30pm EST
decision in the brown versus board of education in 1964. he was the recordholder to this day of the longest one-man filibuster. twenty-four hours and 18 minutes he spoke against the 1957 civil rights bill. we remember him as one of the last of the jim crow demagogues. and he was one of those. what we forget about him is that he was also one of the first of the sun belt conservatives. what do i mean by that? well, it is the major story in the history of 20th century american politics. that is the flow of jobs and industries and resources and populations from the states of the northeast and the midwest to the south and the southwest in a personal period. southern states were recruiting industries and the right to work laws. they were receiving lots of funding from the federal government at a time when the united states was involved in a cold war with the soviet union. states like georgia and texas and florida and other california and north carolina were all being transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift of influence. from 1964 until 2008, it was a period of s
CSPAN
Nov 5, 2012 8:30am EST
to find that magic number. i hope scott brown holds on. but look, it's a cover and i think anybody saw just a few months ago. >> i'd like to make one comment, and i don't mean to just single out one row, one individual, but i've been struck by the fact that some of the super pac ads are not very good. and a just, i'm serious about that. [inaudible] >> but i would think with all the money that those folks, that all these outside groups have, that they could've produced some better ads. i live in northern virginia so i've seen all these ads about the senate race, and i think the ads attacking tim kane at very low production. i do think they are very good looking as but i don't think they're very attractive ads. and i would think you get all that money you have an added that look better on television spent i will say the same for the ads attacking george allen come just in terms of being fair. >> if i were running one of these outside groups i want a nice looking at the eye would want to just put something up for the sake of a summit on air. >> they are not aim for the people industry
CSPAN
Nov 5, 2012 12:00pm EST
joint chiefs of staff, the nation's second highest military officer. he is now the harold brown -- [inaudible] and defense studies at csis. after spending 40 years in the marine corps. today he is playing the national security adviser. a role that comes easy to him. next to him is william -- [inaudible] he's the former u.s. deputy secretary of defense, the number two over at the pentagon, and he served under secretaries robert gates and leon panetta. his job was just this: he managed three million people and a budget of $700 billion. today he is the ceo of drs technologies and another world class cyber expert. beside bill lynn is steven so pinsky, the senior vice president for crowd strike, and he's the former deputy assistant director of the fbi's cyber division. he held the highest ranking position in the fbi's cyber division, and he will be playing, um, the fbi director. so we have general cartwright playing the role of national security adviser, bill lynn is the secretary of defense -- um, this is perfect because it's halloween, so it's kind of even easier to play roles. [la
CSPAN
Nov 8, 2012 5:00pm EST
running in blue states that basically all lost. i mean look at scott brown. i mean, as moderate a guide and for the previous panel, they were talking about what congress needs to do to work together and where you need moderate republicans. you need moderate democrats but on the republican side, scott brown, probably would have been one of these people who could work across party lines, scott brown loses. linda -- in hawaii and moderate republican. she would have been a strong asset i think for that kind of congress that pulls things together. she was a terrific candidate and ran a great campaign but you know running in a republican in a very democratic state in the precedence home state is particularly her, it just rang up no sale. i would add heather wilson in new mexico was another one like that in so to sort of moderate republicans running in very blue states basically all lost and then look at their counterparts. look at the democratic moderates running in the red states. joe donnelly in indiana. now, sure maybe you want to get some credit to his opponent but you know, but he did ma
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2012 8:00am EDT
southern manifesto, which was the protest of the supreme court's decision in the brown v. board of education 1964. strom thurmond is the recordholder to stay at the longest one-man filibuster. 24 hours and 18 minutes he spoke against the 1957 civil rights bill. we remember strom thurmond today is one of the last of the jim crow demagogues and he was. he was not. but we forgot is that he was also one of the first of the sun belt conservatives. what i mean by that? as a sun belt, it's one of the major stories in the history of 20th century american politics. that is the flow of jobs, industry, resources and population from the states of the northeast and midwest, to the south and southwest in the post-world war ii period. southern states were recruiting industries. they were passing right to work laws. they were receiving from you and from the federal government to build military installations that attend the united states was involved in the cold war against the soviet union. states like mississippi, georgia, texas and southern california and arizona and north carolina are all trans
CSPAN
Nov 14, 2012 5:00pm EST
to do that. >> senator brown of massachusetts yesterday lamented -- [inaudible] >> i'm glad to have a chance to respond to that. i've wanted to do that. i saw during the campaign his plea for bipartisanship. that is a big joke. it's a travesty. he was on of the most partisan people that never served here. he could have saved citizens united katie could've been the 60th but i'm not in many other things. so i don't need a lecture from him on bipartisanship. he should go look in the mirror. [inaudible] >> i want to tell you earlier you should never chew complement just like when you're in school. i wanted to tell you earlier but didn't have a chance. john kerry is my rent. i work so hard for him when he was running for president. i did everything i could to help him and he came very, very close. there's been no better legislature then i served with. he's been out front on issues dealing with climate change, and for structure, development and many other things. i don't know any conversations at the president or anyone in the white house has had within any conversation i've had with john
CSPAN
Nov 10, 2012 12:00pm EST
, but he had spent considerable time contemplating the brown wastes around the infantry base depot. and to his continual amazement, being a man who had always thought trees and lakes and mountains important, he loved them. possibly it was their geometric barrenness. perhaps in may when conditions were drier and hotter he would not have loved them so well, the lone and level sands stretching far away. he remembered shelley's traveler from an antique land which could certainly have been egypt. there, as they neared cairo, were the three great pyramids punctuating the perfect line of the horizon like an ancient geometry lesson. still, for all its flatness, the greenness of the delta would have been -- if he could be allowed for a moment to consider the unthinkable -- an unbelievably sight to the africa corps should they ever see it. this is a good war out here in that respect he wrote home a few days later. he has a lush, green land as goal, and we have our goal; ever west which is the direction of home and the traditional american direction. he had been looking forward for a while no
CSPAN
Nov 18, 2012 12:00pm EST
skin and brown-dried blood from head to toe. kermit's skin was blue after they finally found him and put him in the box. did jeff have any skin left to show his mother? i run every day along the river stretching to my left, occasionally veiled by low trees swaying in the sunshine and the light breeze off the water. my left knee started aching 5 miles ago. my teeth are rotting out of my head. my left eye twitches. the detonation rains concrete chunks on my head, peppers the armored truck with molten steel. i reach for my rifle. i run down the road outside my home to the drone of humvee diesel engines and in the purple sunrise over a flat desert. the crazy in my chest is full to bursting, but the protest of my overworked lungs and heart tamps it down. the run makes the rest of the body scream louder, one din to cover another. the foot sits in a box because, why not? where else would you put it? i run, and i don't want to stop. the adrenaline has been building all day, and it finally has a release. the boilover flows. fidgety legs and sweating arms pump and swing. when i stop, the crazy
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2012 8:00pm EST
trips, road trips. i know people think that, hear that and think brown bags and yellow buses, but there is nothing that replaces the sensation of being in an historic place come as the net come the feeling feeling, touching it, sometimes even smelling it. that is what provides us the i keep losing my fib here. and -- >> host: we'll let you get that adjusted. i want to read this quote from your "don't know much about mythology" book. you write, one of the saddest things i have witnessed is how the innate and insatiable yourosty young children have about the world gets absolutely killed by the tedium of school. i also remember so well how myths saved one little by from that tedium. >> guest: true story. again, i like to tell true stories. remember being a child, sitting in school, watching -- we had that clock up on the wall. i would watch the clock tick towards 3:00, when we would get released, and i remember the only time that i felt -- not the only time but certainly one of the times that i felt some sense of real excitement was when our teacher would stop at the enof the day and
CSPAN
Nov 21, 2012 9:00am EST
during that summer, and the administration loses control of it. they wrestle it back after scott brown and after they lost their majority in january of the following year, but then, of course, you've got occupy wall street as welcoming out of the wide firmament of america in the fall of 2011. obama sort of keeps them at arm's length for the part, and i think the thinking -- and i hear this a lot, actually, from a lot of progressive activists over the last few weeks and certainly the last few days -- is a wit of, what's that line, lbj, you know, says to various leaders of his day, make me do it, you know? martin luther king and others, go out there and make me do the right thing. i think people are starting to get a sense that obama in this signaling system between the president and the country that is in need, no doubt about it, even after all obama's done, after a new election there's a sense of a new start is make him arise in new ways to the challenge of the moment. and i think that's an interesting moment he's in now in terms of looking back at his first hyundais in 2009 -- hundred
CSPAN
Nov 9, 2012 12:00pm EST
lost, the one incumbent we have lost so far, scott brown, in a state that obama won with 60%. and, of course, the two most notable democrats were jon tester and claire mccaskill. we saw the same thing in the senate. >> one thing when you talk about mccaskill and you talk about on donnelly in indiana can a large part of the is republican candidate. since i was a very young reporter, wiseguy, the candidates election is a big important for of the game. i think that if you took the two things, if you went back to last january, if a candidate, election and money, what's going to route the coming election and everyone would say super pacs. they threw so much money at this race and yet at the end democrats and an excellent team of candidates and republicans had a few losers are various reasons, and it showed on election night. that was one big lesson that i took away. it has nothing to do with philosophy, or geography or demography. just how pros can change the view by doing their jobs right. >> like a state like north dakota where heidi heitkamp did an excellent job from start to finish the
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2012 12:00pm EST
century history for a number of years, mostly at brown university. as we move through this thing, i started doing this in the 60s, so i didn't teach the 60s because it was in history. later on an important part of my courses and i've written some books which talked about aspects of the 60s. like a lot of other historians, i became a little bit uncomfortable with the notion that the 60s can be described as something 1960 to 1970. historians like to do this. they like to talk about the 30s or or the 20s or the 90s and so forth. sometimes it works. in the 30s you can do that because of depression throughout the decade. mostly it doesn't work because if you look back with in the early 60s, 61, 62, 63, 64 until kennedy's assassination in november 1963, so much a daily life in popular culture and music and politics and the way people dress and so forth seemed very much like the 60s. when we think of the 60s we think of a lot of turmoil, polarization, urban riots rock concerts, woodstock, so forth and so on. and i became convinced that he should not talk about the 60s as 19621970, the some
CSPAN
Nov 19, 2012 12:00am EST
will clearly run for governor and beats pat brown who also beat the knicks and. >> so in effect it comes out of nowhere. progressivism with the turmoil of the night of course, we've no the turmoil of the great depression and obamacare comes out of the great recession. where in the world does the great society come from? and as a kid seven years old i remember 64 we went around the neighborhood to win the war of 1964. it is my awakening. how it is a sense something important happened but one could not predict the revolution and social policy of the great society. the sheer wealth of america, could you talk about that? >> guest: the economy growing nonstop since 1961 and was absolutely powerful. with a steam engine in. i once wrote a book called grand expectations that covers this period. this was the time and johnson was not nothing if not grandiose. not much of a speaker but on top of everything. people contrast did two obama. when you talk about the way johnson managed congress never letting up and on top of things. and wanted to get these things done. with the loud and boisterous
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